Alabama’s Implied Consent Laws: Refusing a Blood, Breath, or Urine Test

The rules and penalties for DUI chemical test refusals in Alabama.

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As in most other states, Alabama has implied consent laws that require drivers who are lawfully arrested for driving under the influence (DUI) to take a blood, breath, or urine test when requested to do so by an officer.

This article looks at Alabama's implied consent law and the consequences a driver faces for refusing to participate in alcohol and drug testing.

Alabama's Implied Consent Law

Alabama's implied consent law specifies that any person who operates a vehicle within the state is deemed to have consented to a blood, breath, or urine test to measure blood alcohol content (BAC) or the type and amount of drugs in the driver's system.

The results of these chemical tests can generally be used as evidence in DUI trials.

Testing Is Required Only If the DUI Arrest is Lawful Under Alabama Law

A driver is required to test only if lawfully arrested for DUI. In other words, the officer must have reasonable grounds to believe the person was driving under the influence to request a BAC test.

An Alabama Driver's Right to Withdraw Consent

Under Alabama law, a driver can refuse to submit to DUI chemical testing. However, there are consequences for doing so. If a driver refuses to take a blood test, the officer will request a different chemical test, breath or urine. And if the driver still refuses a different test, certain consequences will follow.

An officer can't force a driver to test without first obtaining a warrant from a judge.

Consequences of Refusing BAC Testing in Alabama

In most cases, refusing to take a DUI chemical test will result in license suspension and other consequences.

License Suspension for Refusing BAC Testing in Alabama

Drivers who refuse a lawful request by an officer to take a breath or urine test are subject to driver's license suspension. The suspension period will be:

  • 90 days for a first refusal, and
  • one year for a second or subsequent refusal within a ten-year period.

The suspension for a test refusal is separate from any criminal consequences resulting from a DUI conviction and can be imposed even if the DUI charge is ultimately dismissed in criminal court.

How Alabama Prosecutors Can Use a Driver's Refusal in Court

A driver can refuse a chemical test in hopes that a DUI conviction can be avoided. Some people believe that without the test results, a DUI conviction isn't possible.

However, Alabama law allows the evidence of the refusal to be admitted in any civil or criminal case related to the DUI. In other words, the prosecution can tell the jury that the defendant refused to take a BAC test. The jury can then consider the refusal as evidence of guilt—namely, that the defendant was trying to hide his or her intoxication. Thus, even without BAC test results, a person can still be convicted of driving under the influence.

Alabama's Ignition Interlock Enhancement for Implied Consent Violations

Depending on the circumstances, drivers who are convicted of a DUI may be required to use an ignition interlock device (IID) for a period of time. But for DUI offenses involving a BAC test refusal, IIDs are mandatory, and the time period the driver must have the IID is longer than for non-refusal cases.

For example, persons convicted of a first-offense DUI—who aren't normally subject to a mandatory IID requirement—will be subject to a two-year IID requirement if they refused testing. And for second DUI offenders, the normal two-year IID requirement is doubled to four years for an offense involving a refusal.

Talk to an Alabama DUI Attorney

Whether you are wondering if consent or refusal is wiser, or if you have already made the decision, a seasoned DUI attorney can help. License suspensions stemming from a chemical test refusal are separate from the criminal case and are handled in a separate proceeding. A DUI attorney can help you navigate both aspects of your case.

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You should not send any sensitive or confidential information through this site. Any information sent through this site does not create an attorney-client relationship and may not be treated as privileged or confidential. The lawyer or law firm you are contacting is not required to, and may choose not to, accept you as a client. The Internet is not necessarily secure and emails sent through this site could be intercepted or read by third parties.

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